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Throwing a Round Bonsai Pot!
 
04:44
High Quality Bonsai Pots For Sale: http://www.ebay.com/usr/alchimia_ceramics_workshop?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 How to make a round bonsai pot (first stage) A variety of informal containers may house the bonsai during its development, and even trees that have been formally planted in a bonsai pot may be returned to growing boxes from time to time. A large growing box can house several bonsai and provide a great volume of soil per tree to encourage root growth. A training box will have a single specimen, and a smaller volume of soil that helps condition the bonsai to the eventual size and shape of the formal bonsai container. There are no aesthetic guidelines for these development containers, and they may be of any material, size, and shape that suit the grower. Completed trees are grown in formal bonsai containers. These containers are usually ceramic pots, which come in a variety of shapes and colors and may be glazed or unglazed. Unlike many common plant containers, bonsai pots have drainage holes in the bottom surface to complement fast-draining bonsai soil, allowing excess water to escape the pot. Growers cover the holes with a screening to prevent soil from falling out and to hinder pests from entering the pots from below. Pots usually have vertical sides, so that the tree's root mass can easily be removed for inspection, pruning, and replanting, although this is a practical consideration and other container shapes are acceptable. There are alternatives to the conventional ceramic pot. Multi-tree bonsai may be created atop a fairly flat slab of rock, with the soil mounded above the rock surface and the trees planted within the raised soil. In recent times, bonsai creators have also begun to fabricate rock-like slabs from raw materials including concrete[54] and glass-reinforced plastic. Such constructed surfaces can be made much lighter than solid rock, can include depressions or pockets for additional soil, and can be designed for drainage of water, all characteristics difficult to achieve with solid rock slabs. Other unconventional containers can also be used, but in formal bonsai display and competitions in Japan, the ceramic bonsai pot is the most common container. For bonsai being shown formally in their completed state, pot shape, color, and size are chosen to complement the tree as a picture frame is chosen to complement a painting. In general, containers with straight sides and sharp corners are used for formally shaped plants, while oval or round containers are used for plants with informal designs. Many aesthetic guidelines affect the selection of pot finish and color. For example, evergreen bonsai are often placed in unglazed pots, while deciduous trees usually appear in glazed pots. Pots are also distinguished by their size. The overall design of the bonsai tree, the thickness of its trunk, and its height are considered when determining the size of a suitable pot. Some pots are highly collectible, like ancient Chinese or Japanese pots made in regions with experienced pot makers such as Tokoname, Japan or Yixing, China. Today many potters worldwide produce pots for bonsai. Camera: Samsung WB1100F Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 3029 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Create Bonsai Trees From Collected Material: The Fig Tree (Ficus Carica)
 
10:07
In episode 02 we create a fig tree bonsai Yamadori (Ficus carica) from Collected material !!! Ficus carica is an Asian species of flowering plants in the mulberry family, known as the common fig (or just the fig). It is the source of the fruit also called the fig, and as such is an important crop in those areas where it is grown commercially. Native to the Middle East and western Asia, it has been sought out and cultivated since ancient times, and is now widely grown throughout the world, both for its fruit and as an ornamental plant. Ficus carica is a gynodioecious (functionally dioecious), deciduous tree or large shrub, growing to a height of 7–10 metres (23–33 ft), with smooth white bark. The common fig tree has been cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny areas, with deep and fresh soil; also in rocky areas, from sea level to 1,700 meters. It prefers relatively light free-draining soils, and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Camera: Samsung WB1100F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 21674 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Make Bonsai Pot: irregular shape (Freestyle)
 
10:10
High Quality Bonsai Pots For Sale: http://www.ebay.com/usr/alchimia_ceramics_workshop?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 In episode 02 we visit ''Alchimia'' ceramic workshop in Greece and we ask them to make an irregular shape stoneware bonsai pot! ''Alchimia'' ceramic workshop link: https://www.facebook.com/%CE%95%CF%81%CE%B3%CE%B1%CF%83%CF%84%CE%AE%CF%81%CE%B9%CE%BF-%CE%9A%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B1%CE%BC%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AE%CF%82-%CE%91%CE%BB%CF%87%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%B1-workshop-ceramic-210804992356191/ A variety of informal containers may house the bonsai during its development, and even trees that have been formally planted in a bonsai pot may be returned to growing boxes from time to time. A large growing box can house several bonsai and provide a great volume of soil per tree to encourage root growth. A training box will have a single specimen, and a smaller volume of soil that helps condition the bonsai to the eventual size and shape of the formal bonsai container. There are no aesthetic guidelines for these development containers, and they may be of any material, size, and shape that suit the grower. Completed trees are grown in formal bonsai containers. These containers are usually ceramic pots, which come in a variety of shapes and colors and may be glazed or unglazed. Unlike many common plant containers, bonsai pots have drainage holes in the bottom surface to complement fast-draining bonsai soil, allowing excess water to escape the pot. Growers cover the holes with a screening to prevent soil from falling out and to hinder pests from entering the pots from below. Pots usually have vertical sides, so that the tree's root mass can easily be removed for inspection, pruning, and replanting, although this is a practical consideration and other container shapes are acceptable. There are alternatives to the conventional ceramic pot. Multi-tree bonsai may be created atop a fairly flat slab of rock, with the soil mounded above the rock surface and the trees planted within the raised soil. In recent times, bonsai creators have also begun to fabricate rock-like slabs from raw materials including concrete[54] and glass-reinforced plastic. Such constructed surfaces can be made much lighter than solid rock, can include depressions or pockets for additional soil, and can be designed for drainage of water, all characteristics difficult to achieve with solid rock slabs. Other unconventional containers can also be used, but in formal bonsai display and competitions in Japan, the ceramic bonsai pot is the most common container. For bonsai being shown formally in their completed state, pot shape, color, and size are chosen to complement the tree as a picture frame is chosen to complement a painting. In general, containers with straight sides and sharp corners are used for formally shaped plants, while oval or round containers are used for plants with informal designs. Many aesthetic guidelines affect the selection of pot finish and color. For example, evergreen bonsai are often placed in unglazed pots, while deciduous trees usually appear in glazed pots. Pots are also distinguished by their size. The overall design of the bonsai tree, the thickness of its trunk, and its height are considered when determining the size of a suitable pot. Some pots are highly collectible, like ancient Chinese or Japanese pots made in regions with experienced pot makers such as Tokoname, Japan or Yixing, China. Today many potters worldwide produce pots for bonsai. Camera: Samsung WB1100F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 9321 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Make Bonsai Pot: Round Shape
 
10:38
High Quality Bonsai Pots For Sale: http://www.ebay.com/usr/alchimia_ceramics_workshop?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 In episode 01 we visit ''Alchimia'' ceramic workshop in Greece and we ask them to make a round shape stoneware bonsai pot! ''Alchimia'' ceramic workshop link: https://www.facebook.com/%CE%95%CF%81%CE%B3%CE%B1%CF%83%CF%84%CE%AE%CF%81%CE%B9%CE%BF-%CE%9A%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B1%CE%BC%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AE%CF%82-%CE%91%CE%BB%CF%87%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%B1-workshop-ceramic-210804992356191/ A variety of informal containers may house the bonsai during its development, and even trees that have been formally planted in a bonsai pot may be returned to growing boxes from time to time. A large growing box can house several bonsai and provide a great volume of soil per tree to encourage root growth. A training box will have a single specimen, and a smaller volume of soil that helps condition the bonsai to the eventual size and shape of the formal bonsai container. There are no aesthetic guidelines for these development containers, and they may be of any material, size, and shape that suit the grower. Completed trees are grown in formal bonsai containers. These containers are usually ceramic pots, which come in a variety of shapes and colors and may be glazed or unglazed. Unlike many common plant containers, bonsai pots have drainage holes in the bottom surface to complement fast-draining bonsai soil, allowing excess water to escape the pot. Growers cover the holes with a screening to prevent soil from falling out and to hinder pests from entering the pots from below. Pots usually have vertical sides, so that the tree's root mass can easily be removed for inspection, pruning, and replanting, although this is a practical consideration and other container shapes are acceptable. There are alternatives to the conventional ceramic pot. Multi-tree bonsai may be created atop a fairly flat slab of rock, with the soil mounded above the rock surface and the trees planted within the raised soil. In recent times, bonsai creators have also begun to fabricate rock-like slabs from raw materials including concrete[54] and glass-reinforced plastic. Such constructed surfaces can be made much lighter than solid rock, can include depressions or pockets for additional soil, and can be designed for drainage of water, all characteristics difficult to achieve with solid rock slabs. Other unconventional containers can also be used, but in formal bonsai display and competitions in Japan, the ceramic bonsai pot is the most common container. For bonsai being shown formally in their completed state, pot shape, color, and size are chosen to complement the tree as a picture frame is chosen to complement a painting. In general, containers with straight sides and sharp corners are used for formally shaped plants, while oval or round containers are used for plants with informal designs. Many aesthetic guidelines affect the selection of pot finish and color. For example, evergreen bonsai are often placed in unglazed pots, while deciduous trees usually appear in glazed pots. Pots are also distinguished by their size. The overall design of the bonsai tree, the thickness of its trunk, and its height are considered when determining the size of a suitable pot. Some pots are highly collectible, like ancient Chinese or Japanese pots made in regions with experienced pot makers such as Tokoname, Japan or Yixing, China. Today many potters worldwide produce pots for bonsai. Camera: Samsung WB1100F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 5264 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: Bonsai Soil
 
10:04
In episode 05 we are going in the mountain and we find & Collect volcanic soil (Lava Rock) for bonsai! Using volcanic soil to your bonsai plants has many advantages, some include: better aeration of soil, drainage, water retention, pH neutral , clean and inex- pensive. Provides trace elements to plants, some include: Manganese, Cadmium, Copper, Aluminum, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, and Iron. These trace elements are essential in order for your plants to take full advantage of the nutrients you feed them. Camera: Samsung WB1100F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 31163 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Olive Tree (Olea sylvestris) 1st Update
 
13:49
In episode 07 we are going in the mountain and we are doing the 1st update of the very old wild olive tree Yamadori (olea sylvestris) we collected 21 months ago from the wild! Check out here the first video when i collected this wild olive tree: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y6d24kci8I Olea is a genus of about 20 species in the family Oleaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of southern Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australasia. They are evergreen trees and shrubs, with small, opposite, entire leaves. The fruit is called a drupe. There are literally hundreds of cultivars of olive tree. Much like apples, trees with different fruit characteristics have been developed over hundreds of years. The species is very variable and no two tree ever seem to be quite the same. Olea sylvestris, the wild-olive, has been considered by various botanists a valid species and a subspecies of the cultivated olive tree, Olea europea, which is a tree of multiple origins that was domesticated, it now appears, at various places during the fourth and third millennia BCE, in selections drawn from varying local populations. The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree, was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games. The ancient and sacred wild-olive tree of Olympia stood near the Temple of Zeus, patron of the games. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Straight Line, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full sun in summer, less in winter. Requires 1000 Lux as an indoor plant. Leaves can withstand temperatures down to 43F; the roots dislike freezing temperatures, although survival at temperatures down to 25F has been reported. Considered to be hardy in zone 9. The olive can be successfully grown as an indoor plant, but it is best to keep it outdoors in the summer, and should be kept below 64F in winter. To encourage fruiting, the plant should be kept for several weeks with nightly temperatures of 35F and daily temperatures of 60F. Watering: Water thoroughly, but keep slightly dry. Reduce watering in winter. The olive benefit from daily misting. Feeding: Every two weeks from spring to autumn. Do not fertilize for three months after repotting. Use liquid bonsai fertilizer or half-strength general purpose plant food. It can benefit from an addition of pulverized organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Olive have a difficult reputation when it come to branch pruning. If pruning is carried out during spring and grown season. Resultant growth around the cut can be vigorous. The best time to prune for tree shape is during fall. In young trees prune smaller back to the last two or three whorls. Do not prune if temperature fall below 10C. Stem pruning and pinching encourages smaller leaves and shorter internodes. With older trees pinch when branch is still green or is almost violaceous eliminating last couple of leaves. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot every 2-3 years in spring, as buds sprout. Trim about 1/3 of the root ball, and remove a proportional number of the old leaves. If more drastic root pruning is needed, complete defoliation is advised. Repot in free-draining, slightly calciferous soil. Camera: SJCAM - SJ5000 Action Camera SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 5958 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Create Bonsai Trees From Collected Material: The Plane Tree (Platanus)
 
10:22
In episode 01 we create a plane tree bonsai Yamadori (Platanus) from Collected material !!! Platanus is a genus consisting of a small number of tree species native to the Northern Hemisphere. They are the sole living members of the family Platanaceae. All members of Platanus are tall, reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) in height. All except for P. kerrii are deciduous, and most are found in riparian or other wetland habitats in the wild, though proving drought-tolerant in cultivation. The hybrid London plane has proved particularly tolerant of urban conditions. They are often known in English as planes or plane trees. Some North American species are called sycamores (especially Platanus occidentalis, although the term sycamore also refers to the fig Ficus sycomorus, the plant originally so named, and to the Sycamore Maple Acer pseudoplatanus. The flowers are reduced and are borne in balls 3–7 hairy sepals may be fused at the base, and the petals are 3–7 and are spatulate. Male and female flowers are separate, but borne on the same plant (monoecious). The number of heads in one cluster (inflorescence) is indicative of the species. The male flower has 3–8 stamens; the female has a superior ovary with 3–7 carpels. Plane trees are wind-pollinated. Male flower-heads fall off after shedding their pollen. After being pollinated, the female flowers become achenes that form an aggregate ball. The fruit is a multiple of achenes. Typically, the core of the ball is 1 cm in diameter and is covered with a net of mesh 1 mm, which can be peeled off. The ball is 2.5–4 cm in diameter and contains several hundred achenes, each of which has a single seed and is conical, with the point attached downward to the net at the surface of the ball. There is also a tuft of many thin stiff yellow-green bristle fibers attached to the base of each achene. These bristles help in wind dispersion of the fruits as in the dandelion. The leaves are simple and alternate. In the subgenus Platanus they have a palmate outline. The base of the leaf stalk (petiole) is enlarged and completely wraps around the young stem bud in its axil. The axillary bud is exposed only after the leaf falls off. The mature bark peels off or exfoliates easily in irregularly shaped patches, producing a mottled, scaly appearance. On old trunks, bark may not flake off, but thickens and cracks instead. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Broom, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei. Location: Outdoor Position: Place the tree where it will receive morning or evening sun but will not be in direct sunlight at the height of summer, and do not water in direct sun. The delicate foliage can "burn" if exposed to direct summer sun. Water well in early morning or late afternoon to prevent the soil from drying out. Watering: Water regularly keep soil moist not wet as root tend to suffer easily from root rot. Ensure soil is well drained. Feeding: Between early spring and late summer feed biweekly with a balanced low yield fertiliser. Slow release fertilisers are best applied in early spring as new growth appears. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Heavy pruning is best done in early spring before new growth appears. New growth pruning can be done in late spring early summer when 5-6 leaf nodes have grown on a stem. Cut back to leave the last two leaf node. In more mature/established specimens apex nodes are pinched off before they start to grow to encourage lateral shoots and finer branching. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot in spring every year for younger trees and every 2 to 3 years for older trees, shortening the roots by up to a third of their length. Remove dead or damaged roots to avoid root rot. Wiring: Younger branches may be wired sparingly and with care, in spring. Check wire frequently and remove after a few months. Older more stubborn branches will need to be pulled in to position with a wire tourniquet slowly and gradually. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 28427 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Plane Tree (Platanus) 1st Update
 
10:12
In episode 09 we are going in the mountain, in the shadow of pine trees forest and we are doing the 1st update of the platanus tree Yamadori we collected 18 months ago from the wild! Check out here the first video when i collected this platanus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSBg83G285E Platanus is a genus consisting of a small number of tree species native to the Northern Hemisphere. They are the sole living members of the family Platanaceae. All members of Platanus are tall, reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) in height. All except for P. kerrii are deciduous, and most are found in riparian or other wetland habitats in the wild, though proving drought-tolerant in cultivation. The hybrid London plane has proved particularly tolerant of urban conditions. They are often known in English as planes or plane trees. Some North American species are called sycamores (especially Platanus occidentalis, although the term sycamore also refers to the fig Ficus sycomorus, the plant originally so named, and to the Sycamore Maple Acer pseudoplatanus. The flowers are reduced and are borne in balls 3–7 hairy sepals may be fused at the base, and the petals are 3–7 and are spatulate. Male and female flowers are separate, but borne on the same plant (monoecious). The number of heads in one cluster (inflorescence) is indicative of the species. The male flower has 3–8 stamens; the female has a superior ovary with 3–7 carpels. Plane trees are wind-pollinated. Male flower-heads fall off after shedding their pollen. After being pollinated, the female flowers become achenes that form an aggregate ball. The fruit is a multiple of achenes. Typically, the core of the ball is 1 cm in diameter and is covered with a net of mesh 1 mm, which can be peeled off. The ball is 2.5–4 cm in diameter and contains several hundred achenes, each of which has a single seed and is conical, with the point attached downward to the net at the surface of the ball. There is also a tuft of many thin stiff yellow-green bristle fibers attached to the base of each achene. These bristles help in wind dispersion of the fruits as in the dandelion. The leaves are simple and alternate. In the subgenus Platanus they have a palmate outline. The base of the leaf stalk (petiole) is enlarged and completely wraps around the young stem bud in its axil. The axillary bud is exposed only after the leaf falls off. The mature bark peels off or exfoliates easily in irregularly shaped patches, producing a mottled, scaly appearance. On old trunks, bark may not flake off, but thickens and cracks instead. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Broom, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei. Location: Outdoor Position: Place the tree where it will receive morning or evening sun but will not be in direct sunlight at the height of summer, and do not water in direct sun. The delicate foliage can "burn" if exposed to direct summer sun. Water well in early morning or late afternoon to prevent the soil from drying out. Watering: Water regularly keep soil moist not wet as root tend to suffer easily from root rot. Ensure soil is well drained. Feeding: Between early spring and late summer feed biweekly with a balanced low yield fertiliser. Slow release fertilisers are best applied in early spring as new growth appears. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Heavy pruning is best done in early spring before new growth appears. New growth pruning can be done in late spring early summer when 5-6 leaf nodes have grown on a stem. Cut back to leave the last two leaf node. In more mature/established specimens apex nodes are pinched off before they start to grow to encourage lateral shoots and finer branching. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot in spring every year for younger trees and every 2 to 3 years for older trees, shortening the roots by up to a third of their length. Remove dead or damaged roots to avoid root rot. Wiring: Younger branches may be wired sparingly and with care, in spring. Check wire frequently and remove after a few months. Older more stubborn branches will need to be pulled in to position with a wire tourniquet slowly and gradually. Camera: SJCAM - SJ5000 Action Camera SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 4188 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Moss (Bryophyta)
 
10:06
In episode 04 we are going in the mountain and we hunt, find & Collect moss (Bryophyta) to use it for bonsai! Mosses are small flowerless plants that typically grow in dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations. The individual plants are usually composed of simple leaves that are generally only one cell thick, attached to a stem that may be branched or unbranched and has only a limited role in conducting water and nutrients. Although some species have conducting tissues, these are generally poorly developed and structurally different from similar tissue found in vascular plants. Mosses do not have seeds and after fertilisation develop sporophytes with unbranched stalks topped with single capsules containing spores. They are typically 0.2–10 cm (0.1–3.9 in) tall, though some species are much larger. Dawsonia, the tallest moss in the world, can grow to 50 cm (20 in) in height. Since moss gametophytes are autotrophic they require enough sunlight to perform photosynthesis. Shade tolerance varies by species, just as it does with higher plants. In most areas, mosses grow chiefly in areas of dampness and shade, such as wooded areas and at the edges of streams; but they can grow anywhere in cool damp cloudy climates, and some species are adapted to sunny, seasonally dry areas like alpine rocks or stabilized sand dunes. Choice of substrate varies by species as well. Moss species can be classed as growing on: rocks, exposed mineral soil, disturbed soils, acid soil, calcareous soil, cliff seeps and waterfall spray areas, streamsides, shaded humusy soil, downed logs, burnt stumps, tree trunk bases, upper tree trunks, and tree branches or in bogs. Moss species growing on or under trees are often specific about the species of trees they grow on, such as preferring conifers to broadleaf trees, oaks to alders, or vice versa. While mosses often grow on trees as epiphytes, they are never parasitic on the tree. Mosses are also found in cracks between paving stones in damp city streets, and on roofs. Some species adapted to disturbed, sunny areas are well adapted to urban conditions and are commonly found in cities. Examples would be Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus, a garden weed in Vancouver and Seattle areas; Bryum argenteum, the cosmopolitan sidewalk moss, and Ceratodon purpureus, red roof moss, another cosmopolitan species. A few species are wholly aquatic, such as Fontinalis antipyretica, common water moss; and others such as Sphagnum inhabit bogs, marshes and very slow-moving waterways. Such aquatic or semi-aquatic mosses can greatly exceed the normal range of lengths seen in terrestrial mosses. Individual plants 20–30 cm (8–12 in) or more long are common in Sphagnum species for example. Wherever they occur, mosses require liquid water for at least part of the year to complete fertilisation. Many mosses can survive desiccation, sometimes for months, returning to life within a few hours of rehydration. It is generally believed that in northern latitudes, the north side of trees and rocks will generally have more luxuriant moss growth on average than other sides. This is assumed to be because the sun on the south side creates a dry environment. South of the equator the reverse would be true. However, naturalists feel that mosses grow on the damper side of trees and rocks. In some cases, such as sunny climates in temperate northern latitudes, this will be the shaded north side of the tree or rock. On steep slopes it may be the uphill side. For mosses that grow on tree branches, this is generally the upper side of the branch on horizontally growing sections or near the crotch. In cool damp cloudy climates, all sides of tree trunks and rocks may be equally damp enough for mosses. And different species of mosses have different moisture and sun requirements so will grow on different sections of the same tree or rock. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 85007 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Plane Tree (Platanus)
 
10:06
In episode 03 we are going in the mountain and we hunt, find & Collect a plane tree Yamadori (Platanus) for bonsai! Platanus is a genus consisting of a small number of tree species native to the Northern Hemisphere. They are the sole living members of the family Platanaceae. All members of Platanus are tall, reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) in height. All except for P. kerrii are deciduous, and most are found in riparian or other wetland habitats in the wild, though proving drought-tolerant in cultivation. The hybrid London plane has proved particularly tolerant of urban conditions. They are often known in English as planes or plane trees. Some North American species are called sycamores (especially Platanus occidentalis, although the term sycamore also refers to the fig Ficus sycomorus, the plant originally so named, and to the Sycamore Maple Acer pseudoplatanus. The flowers are reduced and are borne in balls 3–7 hairy sepals may be fused at the base, and the petals are 3–7 and are spatulate. Male and female flowers are separate, but borne on the same plant (monoecious). The number of heads in one cluster (inflorescence) is indicative of the species. The male flower has 3–8 stamens; the female has a superior ovary with 3–7 carpels. Plane trees are wind-pollinated. Male flower-heads fall off after shedding their pollen. After being pollinated, the female flowers become achenes that form an aggregate ball. The fruit is a multiple of achenes. Typically, the core of the ball is 1 cm in diameter and is covered with a net of mesh 1 mm, which can be peeled off. The ball is 2.5–4 cm in diameter and contains several hundred achenes, each of which has a single seed and is conical, with the point attached downward to the net at the surface of the ball. There is also a tuft of many thin stiff yellow-green bristle fibers attached to the base of each achene. These bristles help in wind dispersion of the fruits as in the dandelion. The leaves are simple and alternate. In the subgenus Platanus they have a palmate outline. The base of the leaf stalk (petiole) is enlarged and completely wraps around the young stem bud in its axil. The axillary bud is exposed only after the leaf falls off. The mature bark peels off or exfoliates easily in irregularly shaped patches, producing a mottled, scaly appearance. On old trunks, bark may not flake off, but thickens and cracks instead. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Broom, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei. Location: Outdoor Position: Place the tree where it will receive morning or evening sun but will not be in direct sunlight at the height of summer, and do not water in direct sun. The delicate foliage can "burn" if exposed to direct summer sun. Water well in early morning or late afternoon to prevent the soil from drying out. Watering: Water regularly keep soil moist not wet as root tend to suffer easily from root rot. Ensure soil is well drained. Feeding: Between early spring and late summer feed biweekly with a balanced low yield fertiliser. Slow release fertilisers are best applied in early spring as new growth appears. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Heavy pruning is best done in early spring before new growth appears. New growth pruning can be done in late spring early summer when 5-6 leaf nodes have grown on a stem. Cut back to leave the last two leaf node. In more mature/established specimens apex nodes are pinched off before they start to grow to encourage lateral shoots and finer branching. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot in spring every year for younger trees and every 2 to 3 years for older trees, shortening the roots by up to a third of their length. Remove dead or damaged roots to avoid root rot. Wiring: Younger branches may be wired sparingly and with care, in spring. Check wire frequently and remove after a few months. Older more stubborn branches will need to be pulled in to position with a wire tourniquet slowly and gradually. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 60109 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: Air Layering Olive Tree (Olea sylvestris)
 
10:55
In episode 06 we are going in the mountain and we hunt & find an old wild olive tree (olea sylvestris). We do air layering in one of the branches that we would like to collect in few months for bonsai! Olea is a genus of about 20 species in the family Oleaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of southern Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australasia. They are evergreen trees and shrubs, with small, opposite, entire leaves. The fruit is called a drupe. There are literally hundreds of cultivars of olive tree. Much like apples, trees with different fruit characteristics have been developed over hundreds of years. The species is very variable and no two tree ever seem to be quite the same. Olea sylvestris, the wild-olive, has been considered by various botanists a valid species and a subspecies of the cultivated olive tree, Olea europea, which is a tree of multiple origins that was domesticated, it now appears, at various places during the fourth and third millennia BCE, in selections drawn from varying local populations. The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree, was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games. The ancient and sacred wild-olive tree of Olympia stood near the Temple of Zeus, patron of the games. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Straight Line, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full sun in summer, less in winter. Requires 1000 Lux as an indoor plant. Leaves can withstand temperatures down to 43F; the roots dislike freezing temperatures, although survival at temperatures down to 25F has been reported. Considered to be hardy in zone 9. The olive can be successfully grown as an indoor plant, but it is best to keep it outdoors in the summer, and should be kept below 64F in winter. To encourage fruiting, the plant should be kept for several weeks with nightly temperatures of 35F and daily temperatures of 60F. Watering: Water thoroughly, but keep slightly dry. Reduce watering in winter. The olive benefit from daily misting. Feeding: Every two weeks from spring to autumn. Do not fertilize for three months after repotting. Use liquid bonsai fertilizer or half-strength general purpose plant food. It can benefit from an addition of pulverized organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Olive have a difficult reputation when it come to branch pruning. If pruning is carried out during spring and grown season. Resultant growth around the cut can be vigorous. The best time to prune for tree shape is during fall. In young trees prune smaller back to the last two or three whorls. Do not prune if temperature fall below 10C. Stem pruning and pinching encourages smaller leaves and shorter internodes. With older trees pinch when branch is still green or is almost violaceous eliminating last couple of leaves. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot every 2-3 years in spring, as buds sprout. Trim about 1/3 of the root ball, and remove a proportional number of the old leaves. If more drastic root pruning is needed, complete defoliation is advised. Repot in free-draining, slightly calciferous soil. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 335897 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Pine Tree (Pinus brutia) 1st Update
 
13:01
In episode 08 we are going in the mountain, in the shadow of a huge Platanus and we are doing the 1st update of the small pine tree Yamadori (pinus brutia) we collected 20 months ago from the wild! Check out here the first video when i collected this pine tree: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-vn_VRNUS4 Pinus brutia, the Turkish pine, is a pine native to the eastern Mediterranean region. The bulk of its range is in Turkey, but it also extends to the East Aegean Islands of Aegean Sea, the Crimea, Iran, Georgia, Azerbaijan, northern Iraq, western Syria, Israel, Lebanon, and Cyprus. It generally occurs at low altitudes, mostly from sea level to 600 metres (2,000 ft), up to 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) in the south of its range. Pinus brutia is a medium-size tree, reaching 20–35 metres (66–115 ft) tall and with a trunk diameter of up to 1 metre (3.3 ft), exceptionally 2 metres (6.6 ft). The bark is orange-red, thick and deeply fissured at the base of the trunk, and thin and flaky in the upper crown. The leaves (needles) are in pairs, slender, mostly 10–16 cm long, bright green to slightly yellowish green. Pinus brutia, Turkish pine, is closely related to Aleppo pine, Canary Island pine and Maritime pine, which all share many features with it. Some authors have treated it as a subspecies of Aleppo pine, but it is usually regarded as a distinct species. Pinus brutia is a popular ornamental tree, extensively planted in parks and gardens in hot dry areas (such as southern California, Arizona, southern Nevada and west and central Texas in the United States), where its considerable heat and drought tolerance is highly valued. The subspecies eldarica is the most drought tolerant form, used in Afghanistan, Iran and more recently in Arizona, California, and Texas. In the United States Pinus brutia subsp. eldarica is referred to as "Eldarica pine", "Afghan pine" or "Mondell pine". Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Literate, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full Sun to Partial Shade, protect from frost in cooler months. Watering: Prefers a dryish soil, water regularly but only when the soil surface has dried out. Never allow the soil to dry out completely. Misting is appreciated spring and autumn. Soil Acidity: Very Acidic - 5.3 to 6.0, Slightly Acidic - 6.1 to 6.9, Neutral - 7.0, Slightly Alkaline - 7.1 to 7.5, Very Alkaline - 7.6 to 8.2 Soil Texture: Loam - good mixture of clay - silt - sand particles - organic matter and moisture., Sand - large rounded particles, fast draining, few nutrients, quick to dry Soil Moisture: Moist - Damp soil, Dry - Water very sparingly Origins & Spread: Mediterranean, Southern Europe, West Asia Maximum Height: Very Large - over 65 feet Species Growth Rate: Moderate to Fast - 24 to 36 inches per year Longevity : Very Long - greater than 150 years Plant Shape: Conical Camera: SJCAM - SJ5000 Action Camera SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 3410 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Make Your Own Bonsai Tree Pot!
 
01:12
High Quality Bonsai Pots For Sale: http://www.ebay.com/usr/alchimia_ceramics_workshop?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 How to create your own bonsai pot series... Coming soon in Mediterranean Bonsai Channel... A variety of informal containers may house the bonsai during its development, and even trees that have been formally planted in a bonsai pot may be returned to growing boxes from time to time. A large growing box can house several bonsai and provide a great volume of soil per tree to encourage root growth. A training box will have a single specimen, and a smaller volume of soil that helps condition the bonsai to the eventual size and shape of the formal bonsai container. There are no aesthetic guidelines for these development containers, and they may be of any material, size, and shape that suit the grower. Completed trees are grown in formal bonsai containers. These containers are usually ceramic pots, which come in a variety of shapes and colors and may be glazed or unglazed. Unlike many common plant containers, bonsai pots have drainage holes in the bottom surface to complement fast-draining bonsai soil, allowing excess water to escape the pot. Growers cover the holes with a screening to prevent soil from falling out and to hinder pests from entering the pots from below. Pots usually have vertical sides, so that the tree's root mass can easily be removed for inspection, pruning, and replanting, although this is a practical consideration and other container shapes are acceptable. There are alternatives to the conventional ceramic pot. Multi-tree bonsai may be created atop a fairly flat slab of rock, with the soil mounded above the rock surface and the trees planted within the raised soil. In recent times, bonsai creators have also begun to fabricate rock-like slabs from raw materials including concrete[54] and glass-reinforced plastic. Such constructed surfaces can be made much lighter than solid rock, can include depressions or pockets for additional soil, and can be designed for drainage of water, all characteristics difficult to achieve with solid rock slabs. Other unconventional containers can also be used, but in formal bonsai display and competitions in Japan, the ceramic bonsai pot is the most common container. For bonsai being shown formally in their completed state, pot shape, color, and size are chosen to complement the tree as a picture frame is chosen to complement a painting. In general, containers with straight sides and sharp corners are used for formally shaped plants, while oval or round containers are used for plants with informal designs. Many aesthetic guidelines affect the selection of pot finish and color. For example, evergreen bonsai are often placed in unglazed pots, while deciduous trees usually appear in glazed pots. Pots are also distinguished by their size. The overall design of the bonsai tree, the thickness of its trunk, and its height are considered when determining the size of a suitable pot. Some pots are highly collectible, like ancient Chinese or Japanese pots made in regions with experienced pot makers such as Tokoname, Japan or Yixing, China. Today many potters worldwide produce pots for bonsai. Camera: Samsung WB1100F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 9973 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Pine Tree (Pinus brutia)
 
12:18
In episode 02 we are going in the mountain and we hunt, find & Collect a pine tree Yamadori (Pinus brutia) for bonsai! Check out here the update of this pine tree: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiIMc38S2Qw Pinus brutia, the Turkish pine, is a pine native to the eastern Mediterranean region. The bulk of its range is in Turkey, but it also extends to the East Aegean Islands of Aegean Sea, the Crimea, Iran, Georgia, Azerbaijan, northern Iraq, western Syria, Israel, Lebanon, and Cyprus. It generally occurs at low altitudes, mostly from sea level to 600 metres (2,000 ft), up to 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) in the south of its range. Pinus brutia is a medium-size tree, reaching 20–35 metres (66–115 ft) tall and with a trunk diameter of up to 1 metre (3.3 ft), exceptionally 2 metres (6.6 ft). The bark is orange-red, thick and deeply fissured at the base of the trunk, and thin and flaky in the upper crown. The leaves (needles) are in pairs, slender, mostly 10–16 cm long, bright green to slightly yellowish green. Pinus brutia, Turkish pine, is closely related to Aleppo pine, Canary Island pine and Maritime pine, which all share many features with it. Some authors have treated it as a subspecies of Aleppo pine, but it is usually regarded as a distinct species. Pinus brutia is a popular ornamental tree, extensively planted in parks and gardens in hot dry areas (such as southern California, Arizona, southern Nevada and west and central Texas in the United States), where its considerable heat and drought tolerance is highly valued. The subspecies eldarica is the most drought tolerant form, used in Afghanistan, Iran and more recently in Arizona, California, and Texas. In the United States Pinus brutia subsp. eldarica is referred to as "Eldarica pine", "Afghan pine" or "Mondell pine". Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Literate, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full Sun to Partial Shade, protect from frost in cooler months. Watering: Prefers a dryish soil, water regularly but only when the soil surface has dried out. Never allow the soil to dry out completely. Misting is appreciated spring and autumn. Soil Acidity: Very Acidic - 5.3 to 6.0, Slightly Acidic - 6.1 to 6.9, Neutral - 7.0, Slightly Alkaline - 7.1 to 7.5, Very Alkaline - 7.6 to 8.2 Soil Texture: Loam - good mixture of clay - silt - sand particles - organic matter and moisture., Sand - large rounded particles, fast draining, few nutrients, quick to dry Soil Moisture: Moist - Damp soil, Dry - Water very sparingly Origins & Spread: Mediterranean, Southern Europe, West Asia Maximum Height: Very Large - over 65 feet Species Growth Rate: Moderate to Fast - 24 to 36 inches per year Longevity : Very Long - greater than 150 years Plant Shape: Conical Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 471570 Mediterranean Bonsai
From Seed To Bonsai: Platanus On The Rock (The Plane Tree)
 
10:57
In today's episode we are going in the mountain, in the beautiful landscape of Lesvos island in Greece, Klapados waterfall and we are doing the 1st update of the platanus tree we grow from seed on a rock! Platanus is a genus consisting of a small number of tree species native to the Northern Hemisphere. They are the sole living members of the family Platanaceae. All members of Platanus are tall, reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) in height. All except for P. kerrii are deciduous, and most are found in riparian or other wetland habitats in the wild, though proving drought-tolerant in cultivation. The hybrid London plane has proved particularly tolerant of urban conditions. They are often known in English as planes or plane trees. Some North American species are called sycamores (especially Platanus occidentalis, although the term sycamore also refers to the fig Ficus sycomorus, the plant originally so named, and to the Sycamore Maple Acer pseudoplatanus. The flowers are reduced and are borne in balls 3–7 hairy sepals may be fused at the base, and the petals are 3–7 and are spatulate. Male and female flowers are separate, but borne on the same plant (monoecious). The number of heads in one cluster (inflorescence) is indicative of the species. The male flower has 3–8 stamens; the female has a superior ovary with 3–7 carpels. Plane trees are wind-pollinated. Male flower-heads fall off after shedding their pollen. After being pollinated, the female flowers become achenes that form an aggregate ball. The fruit is a multiple of achenes. Typically, the core of the ball is 1 cm in diameter and is covered with a net of mesh 1 mm, which can be peeled off. The ball is 2.5–4 cm in diameter and contains several hundred achenes, each of which has a single seed and is conical, with the point attached downward to the net at the surface of the ball. There is also a tuft of many thin stiff yellow-green bristle fibers attached to the base of each achene. These bristles help in wind dispersion of the fruits as in the dandelion. The leaves are simple and alternate. In the subgenus Platanus they have a palmate outline. The base of the leaf stalk (petiole) is enlarged and completely wraps around the young stem bud in its axil. The axillary bud is exposed only after the leaf falls off. The mature bark peels off or exfoliates easily in irregularly shaped patches, producing a mottled, scaly appearance. On old trunks, bark may not flake off, but thickens and cracks instead. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Broom, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Group planting, Saikei. Location: Outdoor Position: Place the tree where it will receive morning or evening sun but will not be in direct sunlight at the height of summer, and do not water in direct sun. The delicate foliage can "burn" if exposed to direct summer sun. Water well in early morning or late afternoon to prevent the soil from drying out. Watering: Water regularly keep soil moist not wet as root tend to suffer easily from root rot. Ensure soil is well drained. Feeding: Between early spring and late summer feed biweekly with a balanced low yield fertiliser. Slow release fertilisers are best applied in early spring as new growth appears. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Heavy pruning is best done in early spring before new growth appears. New growth pruning can be done in late spring early summer when 5-6 leaf nodes have grown on a stem. Cut back to leave the last two leaf node. In more mature/established specimens apex nodes are pinched off before they start to grow to encourage lateral shoots and finer branching. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot in spring every year for younger trees and every 2 to 3 years for older trees, shortening the roots by up to a third of their length. Remove dead or damaged roots to avoid root rot. Wiring: Younger branches may be wired sparingly and with care, in spring. Check wire frequently and remove after a few months. Older more stubborn branches will need to be pulled in to position with a wire tourniquet slowly and gradually. Camera: SJCAM - SJ5000 Action Camera SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 1490 Mediterranean Bonsai
Collecting Wild Olive Tree for Bonsai
 
02:49
FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Collecting a wild olive tree Yamadori (olea sylvestris)! Olea is a genus of about 20 species in the family Oleaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of southern Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australasia. They are evergreen trees and shrubs, with small, opposite, entire leaves. The fruit is called a drupe. There are literally hundreds of cultivars of olive tree. Much like apples, trees with different fruit characteristics have been developed over hundreds of years. The species is very variable and no two tree ever seem to be quite the same. Olea sylvestris, the wild-olive, has been considered by various botanists a valid species and a subspecies of the cultivated olive tree, Olea europea, which is a tree of multiple origins that was domesticated, it now appears, at various places during the fourth and third millennia BCE, in selections drawn from varying local populations. The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree, was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games. The ancient and sacred wild-olive tree of Olympia stood near the Temple of Zeus, patron of the games. Today, as a result of natural hybridization and the very ancient domestication and extensive cultivation of the olive throughout the Mediterranean Basin, wild-looking feral forms of olive, called "oleasters", constitute a complex of populations, potentially ranging from feral forms to the wild-olive. The wild-olive is a tree of the maquis shrubland, it self in part the result of the long presence of mankind. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 13524 Mediterranean Bonsai
How To Collect Material For Bonsai: The Olive Tree (Olea sylvestris)
 
10:03
In episode 01 we are going in the mountain and we hunt & Collect a very old wild olive tree Yamadori (olea sylvestris) for bonsai! Olea is a genus of about 20 species in the family Oleaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of southern Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australasia. They are evergreen trees and shrubs, with small, opposite, entire leaves. The fruit is called a drupe. There are literally hundreds of cultivars of olive tree. Much like apples, trees with different fruit characteristics have been developed over hundreds of years. The species is very variable and no two tree ever seem to be quite the same. Olea sylvestris, the wild-olive, has been considered by various botanists a valid species and a subspecies of the cultivated olive tree, Olea europea, which is a tree of multiple origins that was domesticated, it now appears, at various places during the fourth and third millennia BCE, in selections drawn from varying local populations. The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree, was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games. The ancient and sacred wild-olive tree of Olympia stood near the Temple of Zeus, patron of the games. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Straight Line, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full sun in summer, less in winter. Requires 1000 Lux as an indoor plant. Leaves can withstand temperatures down to 43F; the roots dislike freezing temperatures, although survival at temperatures down to 25F has been reported. Considered to be hardy in zone 9. The olive can be successfully grown as an indoor plant, but it is best to keep it outdoors in the summer, and should be kept below 64F in winter. To encourage fruiting, the plant should be kept for several weeks with nightly temperatures of 35F and daily temperatures of 60F. Watering: Water thoroughly, but keep slightly dry. Reduce watering in winter. The olive benefit from daily misting. Feeding: Every two weeks from spring to autumn. Do not fertilize for three months after repotting. Use liquid bonsai fertilizer or half-strength general purpose plant food. It can benefit from an addition of pulverized organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Olive have a difficult reputation when it come to branch pruning. If pruning is carried out during spring and grown season. Resultant growth around the cut can be vigorous. The best time to prune for tree shape is during fall. In young trees prune smaller back to the last two or three whorls. Do not prune if temperature fall below 10C. Stem pruning and pinching encourages smaller leaves and shorter internodes. With older trees pinch when branch is still green or is almost violaceous eliminating last couple of leaves. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot every 2-3 years in spring, as buds sprout. Trim about 1/3 of the root ball, and remove a proportional number of the old leaves. If more drastic root pruning is needed, complete defoliation is advised. Repot in free-draining, slightly calciferous soil. Camera: Samsung WB1100 F SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 94064 Mediterranean Bonsai
FREE Amazing Wild Olive Bonsai Tree Yamadori (Olea sylvestris)!
 
10:09
FREE amazing shohin wild olive bonsai (Olea sylvestris) & handmade bonsai pot. In this episode we are doing the 1st Styling of this beautiful olive tree yamadori. Olea is a genus of about 20 species in the family Oleaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of southern Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australasia. They are evergreen trees and shrubs, with small, opposite, entire leaves. The fruit is called a drupe. There are literally hundreds of cultivars of olive tree. Much like apples, trees with different fruit characteristics have been developed over hundreds of years. The species is very variable and no two tree ever seem to be quite the same. Olea sylvestris, the wild-olive, has been considered by various botanists a valid species and a subspecies of the cultivated olive tree, Olea europea, which is a tree of multiple origins that was domesticated, it now appears, at various places during the fourth and third millennia BCE, in selections drawn from varying local populations. The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree, was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games. The ancient and sacred wild-olive tree of Olympia stood near the Temple of Zeus, patron of the games. Styles: Formal upright, Informal Upright, Slanting, Cascade, Semi-cascade, Rock-over-root, Clasped-to-rock, Twin-trunk, Clump, Straight Line, Group planting, Saikei Location: Outdoor Position: Full sun in summer, less in winter. Requires 1000 Lux as an indoor plant. Leaves can withstand temperatures down to 43F; the roots dislike freezing temperatures, although survival at temperatures down to 25F has been reported. Considered to be hardy in zone 9. The olive can be successfully grown as an indoor plant, but it is best to keep it outdoors in the summer, and should be kept below 64F in winter. To encourage fruiting, the plant should be kept for several weeks with nightly temperatures of 35F and daily temperatures of 60F. Watering: Water thoroughly, but keep slightly dry. Reduce watering in winter. The olive benefit from daily misting. Feeding: Every two weeks from spring to autumn. Do not fertilize for three months after repotting. Use liquid bonsai fertilizer or half-strength general purpose plant food. It can benefit from an addition of pulverized organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Leaf and Branch Pruning: Olive have a difficult reputation when it come to branch pruning. If pruning is carried out during spring and grown season. Resultant growth around the cut can be vigorous. The best time to prune for tree shape is during fall. In young trees prune smaller back to the last two or three whorls. Do not prune if temperature fall below 10C. Stem pruning and pinching encourages smaller leaves and shorter internodes. With older trees pinch when branch is still green or is almost violaceous eliminating last couple of leaves. Re-potting & Growing Medium: Repot every 2-3 years in spring, as buds sprout. Trim about 1/3 of the root ball, and remove a proportional number of the old leaves. If more drastic root pruning is needed, complete defoliation is advised. Repot in free-draining, slightly calciferous soil. Camera: SJCAM - SJ5000 Action Camera SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 2195 Mediterranean Bonsai
Mediterranean Bonsai
 
00:16
Bonsai (盆栽) is a Japanese art form using trees grown in containers. Similar practices exist in other cultures, including the Chinese tradition of penjing from which the art originated, and the miniature living landscapes of Vietnamese hòn non bộ. The Japanese tradition dates back over a thousand years. SUPPORT MEDITERRANEAN BONSAI ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/mediterraneanbonsai FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Mediterranean-Bonsai-2191968524425062/ Please Subscribe & Share To Support Our Channel !!!
Views: 1395 Mediterranean Bonsai

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