Home
Videos uploaded by user “Dezeen”
Warka Water towers harvest drinkable water from the air
 
02:44
In this exclusive movie, Italian architect Arturo Vittori explains how his wooden Warka Water structures can provide clean drinking water for rural communities in the developing world. Through the Warka Water project, Vittori is investigating alternative water sources for remote communities without access to running water. "Warka Water is a philosophy looking at the environment and different possibilities to collect and harvest water in a sustainable way," he explains in the movie, which Dezeen filmed at his studio in the countryside outside Rome. Vittori is currently developing a lightweight wooden tower – which is quick and cheap to build without any power tools – that harvests water from the atmosphere via condensation. The tower consists of a bamboo frame supporting a mesh polyester material inside. Rain, fog and dew condenses against the mesh and trickles down a funnel into a reservoir at the base of the structure. A fabric canopy shades the lower sections of the tower to prevent the collected water from evaporating. "Warka Water is currently represented by a tower that reaches up to the sky to collect moisture from the air and brings it down by gravity to the people," Vittori says. The performance of the towers varies depending on the weather, but Vittori's aim is to create a structure that would enable the community to extract up to 100 litres of water a day without the reservoir running dry. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2016/11/10/video-interview-arturo-vittori-warka-water-tower-ethiopia-sustainable-clean-drinking-water-movie/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 120779 Dezeen
Imogen Heap's Mi.Mu gloves will "change the way we make music"
 
04:00
Musician Imogen Heap invited Dezeen to her home-studio to film this exclusive demonstration of her Mi.Mu gesture-control gloves, which allow her to control instruments and computers on stage by using hand gestures. "For the first time I get to see how somebody else uses the gloves," Heap told us. "The minute somebody puts their hands in them, they're starting to think creatively about them. I'm really happy that you're going to see what they're up to." Read the full story on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2014/03/31/imogen-heap-gloves-mini-frontiers-movie/ This movie won a Webby Award: http://www.dezeen.com/2015/04/27/dezeen-wins-2015-webby-award-peoples-voice-technology-video/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 723758 Dezeen
Bjarke Ingels: Architecture should be more like Minecraft
 
06:06
In this movie Bjarke Ingels, founder of architecture firm BIG, explains his theory of "Worldcraft" – creating architecture that focuses on turning "surreal dreams into inhabitable space".
Views: 418306 Dezeen
Producing the world's first 3D-printed bridge with robots "is just the beginning" - Joris Laarman
 
02:21
The technology that startup MX3D is developing to 3D print a bridge in Amsterdam could be used to produce "endless" different structures, says Dutch designer Joris Laarman in this exclusive movie. MX3D is a new research and development company co-founded by Laarman and Tim Geurtjens, which plans to use robots to produce the world's first functional 3D-printed steel bridge over an Amsterdam canal by 2017. "The basics of the technology is pretty simple," Laarman explains in the movie, which was filmed at MX3D's workshop in Amsterdam. "We're using an industrial robot that is usually used in assembly lines in the car industry. We have combined this with a welding machine and our own software to have it 3D print in metal." The six-axis robots that MX3D are adapting are able to rotate their arms along six different planes of movement. They build up structures by depositing small quantities of steel in layers. Unlike traditional 3D printers, robots can produce much larger structures by moving across them as they print. "You're not limited by size, so we can theoretically print endlessly big," Laarman says. The steel footbridge will span eight metres. MX3D originally intended to print the bridge in situ, but had to abandon that plan over health and safety concerns. Laarman and his team will now reconstruct a section of the canal in their workshop to demonstrate that it could be done on site. The bridge will be printed in one piece, with the robots printing a load-bearing structure to support their own weight as they work. "The bridge is going to be fairly small – it's a pedestrian bridge," Laarman says. "It's still a huge challenge, because we want to print it in one go. We want the robots to print their own support structure as they move over the water." Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=832717 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 145943 Dezeen
Architecture doesn't have to be "complicated," says David Chipperfield
 
02:57
British architect David Chipperfield describes his approach to designing The Bryant, his first New York residential tower, in a new video about the project. Read the full story on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=833393 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 59522 Dezeen
"Start a recycling centre" with Dave Hakkens' Precious Plastic factory
 
02:11
See more architecture and design movies on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/features/movies/ In this movie from Eindhoven, Design Academy Eindhoven graduate Dave Hakkens shows us how his Precious Plastic recycling machines work and explains why he made the blueprints freely available online. Hakkens' Precious Plastic project is a set of simple machines for recycling plastic and making new products locally. He says he got the idea for the project after visiting plastic manufacturing companies and discovering that they were reluctant to use recycled plastic. See the full article at Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2013/11/11/dave-hakkens-precious-plastic-recycling-machines-movie/
Views: 69327 Dezeen
Rick Tegelaar interview: Meshmatics Chandelier for Moooi | Design Dreams | Dezeen
 
03:33
Designer Rick Tegelaar explains how the Meshmatics Chandelier he developed at university became a Moooi product in this movie in our Design Dreams series for the Dutch brand. Launched by Moooi at Milan design week in 2017, Tegelaar's Meshmatics Chandelier is made from three concentric, inverted wire-mesh domes of different diameters and heights. The wire structure reflects light emitted from an LED source concealed within a smaller gold dome at the base of the chandelier. "It's a big light, but it's not a big visual block," Tegelaar says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed for Moooi in Arnhem and Amsterdam in the Netherlands. "It's really transparent. It's almost like a cage for the light, so you have all these different transparencies and reflections that give this very basic material something almost magical." The light is the culmination of many years work for Tegelaar – he first developed the technique of using wire mesh to create lights while studying product design at ArtEZ University of the Arts in Arnhem between 2007 and 2011. He says that he felt mixed emotions in finally letting go of the product. "Meshmatics Chandelier being in the collection of Moooi is a bit like my child leaving home," he says. "It is a bit scary, but it's also nice to see the product really taking off and popping up in showrooms around the world." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1236491 WATCH NEXT: Design Dreams: Arihiro Miyake on Coppélia Chandelier - https://youtu.be/X8OSxue1DXI Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 10453 Dezeen
The Shed will create an adaptable and expandable cultural venue for New York
 
04:04
New York firms Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group have designed a cultural building for the city's vast Hudson Yards development, with a sleeve that rolls out to create extra covered event space. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/11/17/shed-hudson-yards-diller-scofidio-renfro-rockwell-group-adaptable-expandable-cultural-venue-new-york/
Views: 54090 Dezeen
MVRDV replaces Chanel store's traditional facade with glass bricks
 
03:11
This movie shows the method behind MVRDV's pioneering glass technology that replaces the brick facade of a former townhouse in Amsterdam with a transparent replica, more suited to the building's new use as a Chanel boutique. Described by the Rotterdam studio as the first of its kind, the innovative facade of Crystal Houses Amsterdam uses glass bricks, windows frames and architraves to recreate the city's traditional architectural style. The glass bricks are held in place with a transparent high-strength glue. According to MVRDV, the construction is "in many ways, stronger than concrete", as was proven during the testing process. Towards the upper storeys, the glass elements merge with the original terracotta brickwork to create the illusion of a dissolving wall. The architects believe the technology offers a solution to the loss of local character in city centres around the world, many of which are now dominated by plain glass shopfronts. "We said to the client, 'Let's bring back what will be demolished but develop it further'," said Winy Maas, one of the three co-founders of MVRDV. Crystal Houses the movie was created by Robert Jan Westdijk for Warenar with the help of people and companies involved in creating Crystal Houses. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=887616 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 77249 Dezeen
Smart Hydro Power's floating turbines provide electricity to the world's most remote locations
 
02:37
In this movie, Karl Kolmsee explains how the small hydrokinetic turbines developed by his company Smart Hydro Power can provide a reliable source of electricity to remote communities in the developing world. Read more on Dezeen: www.dezeen.com/2016/12/15/video-interview-karl-kolmsee-smart-hydro-powers-hydrokinetic-turbine-electricity-worlds-most-remote-locations-movie/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 40938 Dezeen
Fly-through animation of the Bee'ah Headquarters by Zaha Hadid
 
03:11
This movie shows an animated fly-through of the headquarters building for waste management company Bee’ah, in Sharjah, UAE by Zaha Hadid Architects following the 2013 international competition. First revealed in December, the firm's 7,000-square-metre building will occupy a space adjacent to Bee'ah's vast waste management centre in the United Arab Emirates. The movie shows a curved structure shimmering in the heat of the desert. Cladding materials for the project have been selected for their ability to reflect the sun's rays, and help control the temperature inside the building. The curves of the building are modelled on the shape of sand dunes, designed to help the structure withstand the extreme weather conditions experienced on the site. "The formal composition of the new Bee'ah Headquarters building has been informed by its desert context as a series of intersecting dunes orientated to optimise the prevailing Shamal winds, and designed to provide its interiors with high-quality daylight and views whilst limiting the quantity of glazing exposed to the harsh sun," said a statement from Zaha Hadid. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=667579 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 59457 Dezeen
Iris van Herpen translates motion of bird flight into pleated garments
 
05:36
Fashion designer Iris van Herpen has created a series of dresses that replicate the feathers and soundwave patterns of birds in flight, and showcased them alongside a kinetic lighting installation by Studio Drift. Amsterdam-based Van Herpen studied the movement of birds' wings to create her Syntopia collection, which she presented at Le Trianon on 2 July, for Paris Haute Couture fashion week. To accompany them, Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta of Studio Drift created an installation of moving glass tubes that also capture the motion of bird flight. Each of Van Herpen's 17 designs combine both organic and inorganic forms, to highlight the convergence of natural biology and manmade technology. Traditional weaving techniques are combined with high-tech digital fabrication, resulting in a series of garments featuring complex parametric patterns. These range from pleated dresses made from liquid-coated silk organza, to wool coats made using laser cutting. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1234540 WATCH NEXT: Amy Congdon’s couture fashion integrates textile design and tissue engineering - https://youtu.be/CGo91FB1zKg Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 259656 Dezeen
Folding Techniques for Designers: 'v' pleats
 
03:55
In this movie by publishers Laurence King, author Paul Jackson shows how to make 'v' pleats in a sheet of paper, as detailed in chapter four of his book Folding Techniques for Designers. See more architecture and design movies at http://www.dezeen.com/movies Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 110767 Dezeen
BIG's Hyperloop pods to travel at "near supersonic speed"
 
02:28
Bjarke Ingels Group has today unveiled the design of its Hyperloop transportaton pods and network of portals. "near supersonic speed"
Views: 48983 Dezeen
Zaha Hadid video memorial with tributes from Foster, Rogers, Ingels, Levete, Libeskind and more
 
03:51
Leading architects including Norman Foster, Bjarke Ingels, Richard Rogers and Daniel Libeskind have paid tribute to the late Zaha Hadid in a video created by Dezeen and Architizer. Foster called the Iraq-born architect, who died last month, "a very special person" while Libeskind said she was "a star in the firmament of ideas". Filmed in London and New York over the last two weeks, a dazzling array of architects and leading international figures from the arts and media – many of whom had close friendships with Hadid – agreed to speak about the Pritzker-prize winner. Many of them gave moving tributes. "Zaha was a genius," said Deborah Berke, dean of Yale School of Architecture. "She was doing work that nobody else conceived of, never mind figured out how to build." Patrik Schumacher, director at Zaha Hadid Architects and Hadid's closest collaborator, described her as a "monumental innovator". Speaking on camera for the first time since her death of a heart attack on 31 March, aged 65, Schumacher said: "Zaha's historical significance I think, if anything, has been underestimated. She's been a monumental innovator, radically expanding the degrees of freedom one has as a composer in space." He also shed light on Hadid's sometimes fiery temper. "She also had a temper sometimes in work, but it came out of an intense will to excellence and a certain degree of insecurity whether what we had at that time was good enough, which kind of fuelled this drive to do more," he said. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=901155 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 39760 Dezeen
I don't believe in plonking "a Gehry here, a Gehry there", says Kerry Hill
 
02:26
In our final movie from the AHEAD Asia awards last month, Australian architect Kerry Hill says he doesn't believe in "plonk architecture" and instead approaches every building differently. Hill picked up the Outstanding Contribution Award at hospitality awards AHEAD Asia last month for his work on hotels and resorts across Asia. He believes that his success working in the region is due in part to his practice's focus on creating contextually sensitive buildings that draw on local styles, building techniques and materials. "We do not have a common architectural language," he says in the movie, which was filmed at COO hostel and bistro in Singapore. "We like to think that each building is designed especially for its context and its place." He adds: "I don't believe in what I call 'plonk architecture'. What I mean by that is a Gehry here, a Gehry there – architecture at home everywhere and nowhere. I feel that you need to perpetuate the traditions within the culture and material of a place through your architecture, so that it is appropriate." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2017/04/18/video-interview-kerry-hill-architecture-i-dont-believe-in-plonk-architecture-gehry-here-there-movie/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 25414 Dezeen
Casa El Bosque is a house flanked with stone walls facing a Spanish forest
 
02:12
Solid stone walls fronting this house in the Spanish town of Chiva give way to a series of open internal spaces that look out onto the surrounding gardens and a poolside terrace. Ramón Esteve, whose studio is based in Valencia, designed the residence for a site in nearby Chiva. Entitled Casa El Bosque, the property takes its name from the pine forest that surrounds the plot, which also informed the use of natural stone, weathered steel and Afrormosia wood. "Given its location, the materials of the house are taken from the references of the Mediterranean pine forests," said Ramón Esteve in a description of the project. "The masonry walls are combined with Afrormosia timber framing to create a private pleasant atmosphere." The house is loosely arranged as a cross-shaped plan, creating four wings with distinct functions. Each wing culminates in a stone wall facing the forest. Branching out to the rear of the central hallway are the two wings housing the master suite and the other bedrooms, while the two volumes at the front of the site accommodate the living room, as well as the kitchen and dining areas. Two of the stone walls facing the street are positioned on either side of a path that leads to the house's entrance, while an adjacent ramp descends to a garage located beneath the largest of the two bedroom wings. The entrance opens onto a foyer where glazed partitions integrated in the gaps between the rooms look out onto the different outdoor spaces. "The opening sequence of the gaps of the house reflects the hierarchical order of the outdoor areas," Esteve said. "The aim of the proposal is the creation of different outdoor areas linked to the rooms inside, according to their level of privacy," added the architect. Connecting corridors located in the interstitial spaces between the living units are unified by a slatted timber ceiling that aims to provide "a truly human scale". Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2015/05/16/casa-el-bosque-house-flanked-stone-walls-spanish-forest-ramon-esteve-chiva-spain Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 124013 Dezeen
Richard Rogers discusses his seminal Wimbledon house
 
02:27
In this exclusive video interview, British architect Richard Rogers reflects on the influence of the seminal house he designed for his parents at 22 Parkside in Wimbledon, London. Designed in the late 1960s by Rogers and his then wife Su, the Wimbledon house – also known as the Rogers House – was intended to demonstrate a new pre-fabricated construction system, which would enable homes to be built quickly and affordably. "This wasn't going to be a one-off like our previous buildings," Rogers says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed in London. "This was going to be a standardised system to solve the whole of the British housing problem. It didn't! But it did certainly lead to most of the work which I still do some 50 years later and more." Originally designed for Rogers' parents, the building was adapted and extended by Rogers' son Ab, who moved into the house with his family in 1998. The house received Grade-II heritage listing in 2013, and two years later Rogers donated the home to the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1193666 WATCH NEXT: Highlights of Dezeen's politics talk for Good Design for a Bad World - https://youtu.be/CbAb6g7Z2D8 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 39801 Dezeen
Stefan Diez's Soba bamboo furniture naturally changes colour over time
 
01:26
This furniture collection by German designer Stefan Diez is made from unprocessed bamboo canes that gradually change colour as they age. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2017/03/18/stefan-diez-soba-furniture-design-unprocessed-bamboo-canes-change-colour-over-time/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 37182 Dezeen
Frida Escobedo interview: Serpentine Pavilion 2018
 
02:05
In this exclusive Dezeen movie, Mexican architect Frida Escobedo explains why she used stacks of roofing tiles to create this year's Serpentine Pavilion. Escobedo's pavilion, which was unveiled outside the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens, London, this week, is a secluded courtyard framed by latticed walls made from grey concrete roofing tiles. "We wanted to have a fresh idea for the pavilion but that would also speak about we do at the office on an everyday basis," Escobedo says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed at the Serpentine Pavilion 2018 press preview on 11 June 2018. "We usually work with simple materials – industrial materials – and we try to create more sophisticated forms or arrangements with them. It's not about super expensive finishes, it's about what you can create with simple things." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1226725
Views: 22063 Dezeen
Halfbike II is a pedal-powered vehicle designed to improve the rider's balance
 
01:26
This video shows the latest version of the Halfbike – a three-wheeled vehicle similar to a pedal-powered Segway – designed by transport design company Kolelinia. Kolelinia founders Martin Angelov and Mihail Klenov unveiled the first low-tech version of the Halfbike last year and have now launched a new iteration with a curved aluminium frame on Kickstarter. Halfbike II users stand up while peddling, shifting their bodyweight left or right to change direction while holding a vertical handle.The aim is to improve the rider's balance, while offering a fun way to navigate city streets. "We set out to create a vehicle that awakens your natural instinct to move," Kolelinia co-founder Mihail Klenov told Dezeen, "a vehicle that trains your balance and reflexes in a new way." The Halfbike II has a curved aluminium base frame, rather than the chevron-shaped support of its predecessor. The frame connects a plywood handlebar, large front wheel, pedals, a cog and chain mechanism, and two smaller rear wheels. As another change from the previous design, the handlebar now sits above the front wheel rather that connecting to a frame at the cog axis. It is now also available as an all-black model. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=676336 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 260689 Dezeen
Pritzker Prize-winners' best buildings transformed into animated toy blocks
 
02:12
My First Pritzker is an animation by Andrea Stinga that re-imagines the works of architecture's Pritzker Prize-winners as children's building blocks. Barcelona-based architect and motion designer Stinga chose one building from each the 40 winners of the prize to animate as children's toys in a satisfying video that romps through 39 years of architectural history. The Pritzker Prize began in 1979 and is awarded every year, honouring a living architect who demonstrates talent, vision and commitment in their career. In 1988 a decade of the prize was celebrated by selecting two architects to receive the honour. "I'm passionate about finding simple, clean and fun solutions through animation to explain the beautiful complexity of architecture," Stinga, founder of Ombua Architecture, told Dezeen. "I chose one of the selected works for each winner and create the building using simply wooden shapes, like a child's game, to represent them in an iconic and synthetic way so they can be easily recognised." As the animation runs along a timeline, each prize-winning architect's most famous work has been distilled into simple forms and realised in digital versions of wooden shapes. Read more on Dezeen: http://on.dezeen.com/s4ovEE WATCH NEXT: ELEVATION – HOW DRONES WILL CHANGE CITIES official trailer - https://youtu.be/YSlep5XCpaw Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 27355 Dezeen
Baitasi House of the Future features moving walls controlled by a smart TV
 
02:04
Chinese studio Dot Architects has completed a futuristic home in a traditional Beijing hutong, featuring moveable furniture modules and an extension constructed using the WikiHouse open-source architecture platform. Dot Architects developed the Baitasi House of the Future for tech company Whaley, which focuses on smart homes and asked the studio to develop a building suited to the changing lifestyles of future customers. "The boundary between home and society is blurred by the rise of the sharing economy, nomad workers and technology," said the studio. "Our lives are fragmented and cannot be accommodated by a fixed layout. The house of the future should represent such a lifestyle of young people, who can fluidly shift between work and home." The house is located in Beijing's Baitasi hutong – a historically significant neighbourhood full of narrow alleys lined with traditional courtyard houses. Baitasi is one of the core areas during the annual Beijing Design Week, and is the site of co-living space inserted into a typical hutong courtyard as part of the Micro Hutong Renewal project led by architect Zhang Ke. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1130092 WATCH NEXT: Foster and Heatherwick complete Shanghai theatre with curtain-like facade - https://youtu.be/cqIKOjR6qxs Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 31351 Dezeen
Thomas Heatherwick explains design of Coal Drops Yard | Architecture | Dezeen
 
03:45
Thomas Heatherwick explains his thinking behind the design of the soon-to-open Coal Drops Yard shopping centre, in this video filmed in King's Cross, London. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1263630 WATCH NEXT: Foster and Heatherwick complete Shanghai theatre with curtain-like facade - https://bit.ly/2LxsSAh Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 13634 Dezeen
Rotating walls create bedrooms within MJE House by PKMN Architectures
 
02:35
PKMN Architectures has renovated an apartment on the Spanish coast, adding modular storage walls which spin around to create bedrooms. Read the full story on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=829138 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 35585 Dezeen
Zaha Hadid's only house finally completes in Russian forest
 
04:42
New photographs and a movie reveal Zaha Hadid's only completed private residence – a house in the Barvikha Forest near Moscow, for a man she called the "Russian James Bond". The late Iraqi-British architect designed Capital Hill Residence for businessman and philanthropist Vladislav Doronin, who runs property companies Capital Group and OKO Group, and is also the owner of luxury hotel and resort brand Aman. The house's defining feature is a master suite set atop a slender concrete stalk that raises it high above the tree canopy. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=1204224 WATCH NEXT: Zaha Hadid Architects unveils wetland preservation centre for Saudi Arabia - https://youtu.be/yuVpK3yFl9k Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 264320 Dezeen
"Every kind of architectural definition has an in-between space" - Sou Fujimoto
 
03:11
In this movie Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto discusses his philosophy of designing structures that are "in between" opposing concepts such as nature and architecture, and says the approach could work just as well on a skyscraper as a small private house. "Nature and architecture are fundamental themes [of my work]," says Fujimoto, speaking to Dezeen after giving his keynote speech at this year's World Architecture Festival. "I like to find something in between. Not only nature and architecture but also inside and outside. Every kind of definition has an in-between space. Especially if the definitions are two opposites, then the in-between space is more rich." Fujimoto gives his recently completed Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London as an example of his philosophy, in which he used a series of geometric lattices to create a cloud-like structure. "In various meanings it is in between things," he says of the project. "It's made by a grid, but the shape is very soft and complex. The experience is half nature and half super-artificial." Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=377780 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 48630 Dezeen
Lionel T Dean's 3D-printed gold collection aims to transform the jewellery industry
 
03:10
Digital manufacturing could "reshape the jewellery industry," says designer Lionel T Dean, who has created a collection that is 3D printed in 18 carat gold. Dean designed the pieces as part of a project called Precious, a collaboration between five companies including software provider Delcam and precious metal supplier Cooksongold, which is aiming to modernise the UK jewellery industry. The first range, which includes items by Dean and other designers, was unveiled in August at Birmingham City University's School of Jewellery. "We're here today to launch our collection of 3D-printed gold artefacts to demonstrate to the UK jewellery industry the potential of 3D printing," Dean explains in the movie. "Additive manufacturing with metal allows you to create forms that would be almost impossible to create by conventional means." While the jewellery industry has used 3D printing to create moulds for a long time, Dean says it has been much slower to take up printing directly with metal. "The jewellery industry was one of the early adopters of additive technology, using it in an indirect sense," he says. "So printing waxes and casting from those waxes. It's been more reluctant to adopt direct metal processes." One of the reasons for this is the high value of the raw materials. Initially, Dean tried using a regular laser-sintering machine to produce his jewellery, but the wastage was too high. Cooksongold provided a laser-sintering machine called the Precious M080, which it developed together with 3D printer manufacturer EOS specifically for use with precious metals. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=762340 Subscribe to Dezeen's YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/dezeenmagazine?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 133970 Dezeen
VeloMetro's pedal-powered Veemo vehicle aims to get people out of their cars
 
02:43
In this movie filmed in Vancouver, Kody Baker explains how his start-up VeloMetro is hoping to convince people to switch to a cleaner, healthier form of transport with a car-like vehicle that you pedal like a bike. Called Veemo, the three-wheeled vehicle is fully enclosed and features a steering wheel, bucket seat and a lockable boot like a car, but must be pedalled to operate. It is aimed at people living in cities who would normally be put off from cycling, says VeloMetro co-founder Baker in the movie, which was filmed at the start-up's studio in Vancouver, Canada. "Studies have shown that up to 60% of a city's population would like to cycle more, but they don't right now," he says. "They don't want to be exposed to the elements, they're afraid of riding in traffic, they don't have any room for storage. The Veemo really solves all these issues." The increased weight of the vehicle compared to a traditional bicycle is offset by battery-powered electric motors, which assist the driver as they pedal. "It has pedals like a bike, but as you pedal we add the strength of two Olympic athletes through our motors," Kody says. "It's providing a car-like experience, but it's regulated as a bicycle. So you don't need a driver's license, you don't need insurance. You have access to bike lanes, so you're not stuck in traffic." The Veemo is being developed as an alternative to car-sharing networks, where customers have access to a fleet of vehicles they can hire for short-distance trips, and VeloMetro is developing a mobile app to enable people to locate, book and unlock the vehicles. "We really designed Veemo from the ground up to be directed towards sharing networks, so that you can rent it by the minute," Kody explains. "You use your cellphone, find the vehicle that is closest to you and unlock it with the app. You get in, enter your pin number, and then you're good to go." Read more on Dezeen: Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 44081 Dezeen
Pentatonic turns smartphones, cans and cigarette butts into flat-pack furniture
 
02:17
Start-up company Pentatonic is aiming to "radically transform consumption culture" with a range of furniture and products created from food, electrical, plastic and textile waste. The company, led by Jamie Hall and Johann Boedecker, is working with an adapted injection-moulding process to transform waste materials into homeware. It will launch its first collection of customisable flat-packed furniture – all made entirely from recycled materials – during this year's London Design Festival. When it comes to making the furniture, the type of rubbish used is determined by its properties. Typical examples include smartphones, cans and cigarette butts. "Subject to what product, finish or performance we are looking for, we select trash based upon its properties and application possibilities, and then apply this technology using a number of precision manufacturing processes," the studio told Dezeen. With plastic, the waste is washed and sorted before being shredded into pellets, to create a new material ready to be formed into furniture. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1126462 WATCH NEXT: Nadadora models Tortuga chair for Sancal on tortoise shell - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiS6LLpQWE8 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 27581 Dezeen
Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich develop knitted concrete system
 
04:18
A double-curved concrete shell made with a 3D-knitted formwork in a collaboration between Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich has gone on display in Mexico City. KnitCret is a new 3D-knitted textile system for creating curving concrete structures, without the need for expensive and time-consuming moulds. The colourful pavilion is called KnitCandela in homage to the work of Spanish-Mexican architect and engineer Félix Candela, who created dramatic curved concrete shells in his buildings such as the Los Manantiales Restaurant in 1958. Over two miles of yarn was knitted into four strips of between 15 and 26 metres in just 36 hours using a digital fabrication technique, then flown over from Switzerland to Mexico in suitcases. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1280910 WATCH NEXT: Neri Oxman's swarm of Fiberbots autonomously build architectural structures - https://youtu.be/ViYdvvCJXwQ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 35611 Dezeen
KC Design Studio adds perforated facade and atrium to skinny Taiwanese townhouse
 
01:47
KC Design Studio has updated a 3.7-metre-wide house in Taiwan by adding a perforated facade and a lightwell, both intended to combat the lack of daylight in the 50-year-old property. The designers were asked to improve the natural lighting in the old home, which is situated in close proximity to noisy tourist attractions and night markets. But they were also asked to avoid compromising the client's privacy or security. "Considering the lack of privacy and good view, we decided to design the house inward and upward," explained studio co-founders Chun-ta Tsao and Kuan-huan Liu, who previously updated another home in Taiwan with rotating walls. "The front of each floor is set back to form a buffering semi-outdoor space between the streets and residence areas," they continued. "With large windows located both at the front and the back, and use of an atrium in the middle, sunlight can naturally flow into every corner of the house." Despite being less than four metres wide, the skinny house comprises an open-plan kitchen and living room, a play area, along with three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an ensuite. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2017/03/15/kc-design-studio-perforated-facade-atrium-skinny-taiwanese-house/ WATCH NEXT: I don't believe in plonking "a Gehry here, a Gehry there", says Kerry Hill - https://youtu.be/TyeP3gIseZQ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 41646 Dezeen
Automata aims to "democratise robotics" with $3000 six-axis robot
 
03:09
Future Makers: in this movie filmed by Dezeen in London, Suryansh Chandra claims the affordable robotic arm his company Automata is developing could lead to robots becoming as ubiquitous as desktop 3D printers. "Today, every design studio has a 3D printer," Chandra says. "Soon, we hope to get to the point where every design studio has a robotic arm." Chandra founded Automata together with Mostafa Elsayed five months ago, after they became frustrated by the expense and complexity of industrial robots while working at the research division at Zaha Hadid Architects. "If you're out to get a robot today, you'd have to spend 50 or 60 thousand dollars," Chandra explains. "Our goal is to democratise robotics through a low cost hardware platform and easy to use software." Automata's first product is a plastic six-axis robotic arm called Eva, which weighs 2.3 kilograms and will cost $3,000 (£2,000). "Unlike industrial robots that are heavy and expensive, Eva is low cost and lightweight," Chandra says. "She can pick up 750 grams when fully outstretched and about a kilogram in a more recessed position." Eva is designed to be extremely easy to operate. Users will be able to move the arm into the positions they want by hand and the robot will repeat the movement. "We've made the software so simple that you can practically do it without any programming," Chandra says. "You can physically move the robot from one point to another and it records the motion and plays it back flawlessly." Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=786420 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 152118 Dezeen
MIT's 3D-printed inflatables could shape the interiors of the car of future
 
01:56
Car interiors could morph into different configurations at the flick of a switch, using 3D-printed inflatable structures developed by researchers at the MIT. The Self-Assembly Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) worked with BMW on the project, called Liquid Printed Pneumatics. The German auto brand wanted to see how the lab's experimental engineering techniques could help it realise some of the shapeshifting features imagined in its futuristic concept cars. The result is a stretchy, inflatable silicone prototype that can take on a number of different shapes depending on the level of air pressure inside. Self-Assembly Lab Team: Bjorn Sparrman, Shokofeh Darbari, Rami Rustom, Maggie Hughes, Schendy Kernizan, Jared Laucks, Skylar Tibbits BMW Team: Sophie Richter, Akos Stegmar Commissioned by the Victoria & Albert Museum, London Music by Lullatone Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1215609 WATCH NEXT: Foster + Partners completes BBC headquarters in Cardiff - https://youtu.be/7nbIVpn7094 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 19399 Dezeen
Sliding walls move to create various layouts inside Garden House by Caspar Schols
 
01:00
Wooden walls move along runners to reveal the inner glass shell of this gabled garden shed in Eindhoven, designed and built by Caspar Schols as a hobby space for his mother. Schols designed the pavilion with no formal architecture training after his mother asked for a pavilion that could be used for dinner parties with friends, theatre performances by her grandchildren, painting and meditating. The Garden House sits on the edge of a pond in Schols' parents' garden. It is made almost entirely of douglas fir wood and at first glance looks like a typical garden shed. But Schols separated the inner beam-and-glass structure from the outer wooden walls and metal roof and set them on runners. The walls part in the middle and can be wheeled inwards and outwards to create different layouts. "I was looking for a design with a lot of flexibility, if possible a design that has the flexibility of clothes," said Schols. "You should be able to get away with changing the layers of the house almost as easily as changing clothes when desired." The pavilion contains a bed that lifts out of the structure's raised base and a small black wooden fireplace is set in the centre of the floor. In inclement weather, the walls can be closed to create a warm and cosy shelter with outdoor terraces on either side. As the weather gets warmer the outer shell is designed to be slid open to offer more light, leaving the inner glass shell to protect against any rain or wind. Doors on the east and west side of the house can be opened up to allow for a breeze. In sunnier weather, this glass shell can be parted to create an outdoor living space in the centre, where the bed, fireplace and furniture are open to the elements. "Think of how you can sleep under the stars, go sunbathing, have a barbecue party, or just relax and enjoy your freedom while being perfectly comfortable," said Schols. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=990961 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 1894151 Dezeen
Kengo Kuma interview: V&A Dundee museum is like a "sea cliff" | Architecture | Dezeen
 
02:04
In this exclusive video interview, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma reflects on the relationship between his V&A Dundee museum building and the sea. Part of a £1 billion renovation scheme for Dundee's waterfront, the dark, ridged concrete form of the V&A Dundee looms out over the Firth of Tay like a craggy rock face. "The location for this project is very unique, between water and land," Kuma says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed in Dundee. "We tried to show the uniqueness of this location by designing a sea cliff, between the water and the land, which is the result of a conversation between nature and artefact." Creating a man-made form that could echo the wind-swept process of erosion from crashing waves required a new level of technology and engineering. Kuma worked with engineers from Arup to produce a 3D model that could be used to test and analyse various forms for the building. "We tried to achieve that natural, organic quality by designing this unique facade and the unique shape," Kuma explains. "New technologies can make the organic form possible." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1262659
Views: 20316 Dezeen
Architectural Association students test the limits of timber in experimental woodland canopy
 
03:21
A sculptural, tensile timber canopy has been constructed in Dorset woodland by five students from the Architectural Association as part of the school's Design + Make programme. Built on the school's Hooke Park forest campus in Dorset, England, Sawmill Shelter provides rain cover for the campus' sawmill and its operator. However, it also forms part of an ongoing investigation by Design + Make students into the potential of lightweight timber construction. "The canopy forms a test-bed for the experimental prototyping of structural systems that will be deployed in the next planned construction at Hooke Park – a lecture hall and library that will form the academic centre of the campus," said the team. "The main investigation was to test the limits of use of timber in tension in the form of an anticlastic surface that can resist both snow loads and wind uplift." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2017/06/24/architectural-association-students-test-the-limits-of-timber-in-experimental-woodland-canopy/ WATCH NEXT: Carlo Ratti experiments with "programmable wood" to make Swish stool for Cassina - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S44kLnyej7I Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 14941 Dezeen
Serpentine Pavilion glows at night to "attract people to come and celebrate" says Francis Kéré
 
03:07
In an exclusive Dezeen movie, Berlin-based architect Diébédo Francis Kéré explains how the colour of his Serpentine Pavilion and the way it lights up at night are references to his childhood in Burkina Faso. Kéré's oval-shaped structure features a courtyard enclosed by curving walls made from stacked wooden blocks, sheltered by a large, slatted timber roof. The form of the canopy is informed by a tree in the village of Gando in Burkina Faso, where Kéré grew up. "The pavilion that I was commission to do is inspired by a tree," he explains in the movie, which Dezeen filmed at the Serpentine Pavilion 2017 press preview in London yesterday. "Where I come from in Burkina Faso, a tree is often a public space. It can be a kindergarten, it can be a market – a gathering place for everyone." The intention was to create a structure that provides shelter, while allowing visitors to experience the natural elements, Kéré says. "The idea was to create a huge canopy that allows the visitors to feel the elements but being protected," he explains. "It is enclosed by wooden blocks which are perforated and allow the air to circulate, which creates comfort inside." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1099558 WATCH NEXT: Drone footage captures brutalist Robin Hood Gardens ahead of imminent demolition - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ge0r7Z1YZQ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 19201 Dezeen
Wang Shu's Ningbo History Museum built from the remains of demolished villages
 
02:16
In this exclusive Dezeen movie, Chinese architect Wang Shu of Amateur Architecture Studio explains why he recycled material from traditional Chinese buildings to construct the Ningbo History Museum. Completed in 2008, the Ningbo History Museum is a 30,000-square-metre building located in the city of Ningbo in Zhejiang province, China. The three-storey museum's distinctive facade is largely composed of debris collected from the surrounding area, where traditional Chinese towns and villages were demolished to make way for new developments. "Originally in this area there were about thirty beautiful villages and they demolished every village," Wang says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed at the Royal Academy in London. "Everywhere you go, you find ruins of buildings that have been demolished." "But everywhere there are materials, beautiful materials," he continued. "So I wanted to build this museum for the people who were originally living here so they can keep some memories." Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2016/08/18/video-interview-wang-shu-amateur-architecture-studio-ningbo-history-museum-movie/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 13210 Dezeen
Studio Swine and COS create sculptural tree that blossoms with mist-filled bubbles
 
02:15
Studio Swine has released a movie revealing its Milan design week installation for COS – a tree-like structure that emits pale white bubbles, which dissolve into pale white mist as they burst. The London-based duo – Japanese designer Azusa Murakami and British designer Alexander Groves – wanted their installation to be reminiscent of cherry blossom trees. Called New Spring, the six-metre high structure consists of slender tubes that extend up and out like the branches of a tree. Large translucent bubbles emerge from the ends of each branch. These bubbles burst when they come into contact with skin, but not when they touch textured fabrics – meaning visitors can handle them with gloves. As they burst, a pale mist is released. Like many of Studio Swine's past projects – which include accessories made from hair and furniture produced from ocean plastic – the installation is an exploration of unusual materials. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1067095 WATCH NEXT: Nike releases Air Max shoebox made from recycled cartons and coffee lids - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6zCkTQD7Tc&t=5s Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 16166 Dezeen
Mrs Fan's Plugin House in Beijing
 
02:46
This video shows the People's Architecture Office repurposed rundown home in one of Beijing's historic hutong neighbourhoods, using prefabricated panels to create a contemporary and light-filled residence. The Beijing studio overhauled and extended the residence in the Changchun Jie Hutong neighbourhood using a series of white panels. The client Mrs Fan had lived in the house as a child until her parents moved to an apartment block in the suburbs. Mrs Fan wanted to move closer to her job in the city, but struggling to find affordable modern accommodation she asked People's Architecture Office to overhaul her childhood home with its Plugin panels. The team developed the panels as an affordable and temporary way to update living spaces within the ageing structures of the city's hutong districts. It recently updated the Plugin design to make them waterproof so that they can be used on the exterior of existing residences. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/12/08/mrs-fans-plugin-house-renovation-beijing-china-peoples-architecture-office/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 33864 Dezeen
Moshe Safdie interview with Dezeen about the Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
 
02:35
This movie featuring Moshe Safdie of Safdie Architects speaks to Dezeen about the Marina Bay Sands development in Singapore.
Views: 15939 Dezeen
Diébédo Francis Kéré's career began when he built a school for the village he grew up in
 
02:09
In this exclusive movie produced by Dezeen, Serpentine Pavilion architect Diébédo Francis Kéré reveals how building a school for his home village in Burkina Faso was the starting point for his career. Kéré was born in a village named Gando, a village on the east side of the African country. While studying to become an architect in Germany, back in 2001, he embarked on a building project for the place where he grew up. "In my culture everyone has to put his path to push the community forward, so I started to build a school," he explains in the film. Kéré was the first son of the head of the village, who allowed him to attend school as a child – although this was very rare. By building Gando Primary School, Kéré made it possible for any child in the village to receive an education. It was his first ever architecture project, and set a precedent for a style of architecture that combines traditional building techniques with modern engineering methods. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1140933 WATCH NEXT: New Burkina Faso parliament building "responds to needs of the people" says Diébédo Francis Kéré - https://youtu.be/Rws9rTaIG90 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 8782 Dezeen
Man-made leaf that could enable humans to colonise space
 
02:55
This video show a synthetic biological leaf, which absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant. Develooped by RCA graduate Julian Melchiorri, he says this innovation could enable long-distance space travel. "Plants don't grow in zero gravity," explains Melchiorri. "NASA is researching different ways to produce oxygen for long-distance space journeys to let us live in space. This material could allow us to explore space much further than we can now." Melchiorri's Silk Leaf project, which he developed as part of the Royal College of Art's Innovation Design Engineering course in collaboration with Tufts University silk lab, consists of chloroplasts suspended in a matrix made out of silk protein. "The material is extracted directly from the fibres of silk," Melchiorri explains. "This material has an amazing property of stabilising molecules. I extracted chloroplasts from plant cells and placed them inside this silk protein. As an outcome I have the first photosynthetic material that is living and breathing as a leaf does." Read the full story on Dezeen: www.dezeen.com/2014/07/25/movie-silk-leaf-first-man-made-synthetic-biological-leaf-space-travel See more design and technology movies on Dezeen: www.dezeen.com/minifrontiers Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 24500 Dezeen
Peter Zumthor interview at Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London
 
03:53
See more architecture and design movies at http://www.dezeen.com/movies Here's a movie interview Dezeen filmed with Peter Zumthor in May 2011, in which he told us "I'm a passionate architect and I think it's a beautiful profession." Speaking at the opening of his Serpentine Gallery Pavilion (pictured) in London, Zumthor said, "I do not work for money; I'm not going for commercial projects. I go for projects where I can put my heart into it and which I think are worthwhile." He also told us how he started out in his father's cabinet-making workshop, went to art school and "slowly, slowly" became an architect. "Now maybe soon I'll become a landscape architect too," he added. The pavilion featured a black walled garden framing a strip of wild planting by Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf. Zumthor, who was also awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2009, will be presented with the Royal Gold Medal for architecture in a ceremony at the Royal Institute of British Architects in London on 6 February 2013. See more of Dezeen's architecture and design movies here: http://www.dezeen.com/tag/dezeen-movies
Views: 12676 Dezeen
Interview: Thomas Heatherwick discusses Coal Drops Yard | Architecture | Dezeen
 
01:49
Thomas Heatherwick explains his desire to create a new public space for London in this exclusive video interview Dezeen filmed at the recently opened Coal Drops Yard shopping centre in King's Cross. Designed by Heatherwick Studio, the Coal Drops Yard contains shops arranged in two converted 19th-century coal warehouses, connected by roofs that curve out to touch each other. Between the two linear buildings is a publicly accessible space. "Coal Drops Yard is a new major public space for London, which is framed by retail, so it's like a new shopping street," Heatherwick says in the video. Coal Drops Yard is the latest building completed within the King's Cross development. It stands alongside Granary Square between Central St Martins and Wilkinson Eyre's Gasholders apartments. Heatherwick wants the development to be a space the public can visit and enjoy within the development. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1279531 WATCH NEXT: Kengo Kuma interview: V&A Dundee museum is like a "sea cliff" - https://youtu.be/Y4EFQVTLexQ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 8105 Dezeen
Daan Roosegaarde's Smog Free Tower opens in Rotterdam
 
01:47
Designer Daan Roosegaarde has installed the “largest smog vacuum cleaner in the world” in Rotterdam to help improve the city’s air quality. Roosegaarde's Smog Free Tower was unveiled on 4 September 2015 at Vierhavensstraat 52, following a successful Kickstarter campaign to help fund the project. The seven-metre-tall structure is designed to create a pocket of clean air in its vicinity, offering a respite from hazardous levels of pollution. According to the designer, it processes 30,000 cubic metres of air per hour – removing ultra-fine smog particles and pumping out clean air using no more electricity than a water boiler. "The Smog Free Tower produces smog-free bubbles of public space, allowing people to breathe and experience clean air for free," said a statement from Roosegaarde. The smog is sucked in through its top, then the purified air is released through vents on the six sides. Its patented technology works in a similar way to air purification systems used in hospitals. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2015/09/07/daan-roosegaarde-smog-free-tower-opens-rotterdam-netherlands/ Subscribe to Dezeen's YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 96955 Dezeen
Interview: Winy Maas of MVRDV on Balancing Barn
 
02:53
In this short film made by Dezeen, architect Winy Maas of Rotterdam firm MVRDV talks about Balancing Barn, a cantilevered house in Suffolk, England. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2011/02/21/interview-winy-maas-of-mvrdv-on-balancing-barn/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 21502 Dezeen
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2000 by Zaha Hadid
 
02:03
Next up in our exclusive video series celebrating the fifteenth Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, gallery director Julia Peyton-Jones looks back at how Zaha Hadid's 2000 marquee launched the annual commission. Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=754171 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh
Views: 16588 Dezeen
Textiles are a "simple, smart material" says Kvadrat Soft Cells design director
 
02:21
Kvadrat Soft Cells design director Jesper Nielsen explains the advantages of the three-dimensional textile panel system his team is developing in this movie Dezeen filmed for Kvadrat in Copenhagen. Kvadrat Soft Cells is a modular system produced by Danish textile company Kvadrat. Each panel comprises a recycled aluminium frame filled with acoustic foam, which can be covered with a wide range of Kvadrat textiles. "Currently Soft Cells consists of a very large variety of planar panels, with a patented technology for tensioning almost any kind of textile," Nielsen explains in the movie, which Dezeen filmed at Kvadrat's recently opened design workshop by architecture firm Caruso St John. "One of the concepts that our innovation department is presently focusing on is going out of the plane, creating three-dimensional panels," he adds. "It is the result of enquiries that we have had over the years from architects working with free-form surfaces." Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/2017/07/14/video-interview-jesper-nielsen-kvadrat-soft-cells-three-dimensional-acoustic-panels-movie/ WATCH NEXT: Kvadrat's handmade acoustic panels bring "softness" to minimalist spaces - https://youtu.be/1eInOdomWhY Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 11259 Dezeen

Grad school personal statement sociology
Format report essay spm my best
Resume currently working
How to write a great personal statement for scholarships
Us report service