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Search results “Nls database parameters in oracle” for the 2017
Oracle SQL Tutorial 30 - UTF-8 and UTF-16 Character Sets
 
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A few videos ago we discussed UTF-8 and UTF-16 encoding, but when we are working with a database we do not worry about encodings as much as we do character sets. That's because a specific character set is going to have a specific encoding. The reason I am making this video is to introduce you to the most common character sets and to teach you the differences. That’s because as we go into the national character sets we need to understand the information taught in this video. So the first character set I am going to teach you about is AL32UTF8. AL32UTF8 is a character set that uses the uff-8 encoding and each character can take up to 4 bytes with the utf-8 encoding. There is another character set (not encoding) called utf8 (no hyphen) which is also encoded with UTF-8. This can be a little confusing because UTF8 is the name of an encoding and a character set, but bear with me. Both of these character sets are UTF-8 encoded, but UTF8 uses an older version of UTF-8 encoding. Generally, they work about the same, but the way certain characters are stored is slightly different, specifically way certain characters are stored is slightly different, specifically what are known as supplementary characters, which take up 4 bytes. The max size for a UTF8 character set is 3 bytes, as they do not directly support the supplementary characters as 4 bytes but instead store them across 2 groups of 3 bytes each. Oracle recommends that you use AL32UTF8 for all future development instead of the archaic UTF8 character set. There is another character set that you should know about, and that is AL16UTF16, which uses the UTF-16 encoding. Watch my video over UTF-8 and UTF-16 to learn more about UTF-16. Lastly, there is a character set known as UTFE, which uses an encoding known as UTF-EBCDIC. This is like a super archaic character set, and I'm not even going to talk about it. I thought I would at least mention it as it is going to come up a bit in the next video's topic. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 6836 Caleb Curry
db files change
 
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Change the DB_FILES parameter in ORACLE without changing the control file.
Views: 90 Imraan Grace
Oracle TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-timezone-functions/ The Oracle TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ function can be confusing, but we’ll explain it in this video. This function allows you to convert a string value into a TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE value. A TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE value is a type of DATE, but has a few components: - A date, including day, month, and year - A time, including hours, minutes, and seconds - A time zone, which is the number of hours and minutes difference from GMT This is a useful data type because it allows you to store dates in different time zones, and allow users in other time zones to see the data in a way that makes sense to them. The time zone part is the difference from GMT. This means that a “+7:00” is 7 hours ahead of GMT (e.g. Bangkok) and “-5:00” is 5 hours behind GMT (e.g. US Eastern Standard Time). The syntax of the TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ function is: TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ ( input_string [, format_mask] [, nls_param] ) The input_string parameter is the string you want to convert. The format_mask is where you specify the format of the input_string parameter. This is so you can specify the input_string in a variety of formats, and just use this format_mask to indicate which format it is in. The nls_param parameter is another optional parameter, and allows you to specify the returning language of the month and day names. For more information on the Oracle TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ function, including the SQL used in this video, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-timezone-functions/
Views: 87 Database Star
DataStage: Basics: NLS and Unicode
 
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This IBM Counter Fraud Management (ICFM), or ICFM 2, video explains ICFM's and DataStage's Basics with NLS and Unicode
Import Tables Oracle IMP
 
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Link archivo dmp de los Simpsons https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BwqMDMhKTH1TR1ctNW5hR0prWnc
Views: 108 Memoide Oracle
113- Oracle SQL 12c: Managing Data in Different Time Zones 1
 
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EXAM 1Z0-061 EXAM 1Z0-071 •Time Zones. •Timestamp Data type •timestamp with time zone •timestamp with local time zone •V$TIMEZONE_NAMES •DBTIMEZONE •SESSIONTIMEZONE •current_date •current_timestamp •Localtimestamp •alter session set time_zone •Extract expression •TZ_OFFSET •from_tz •to_timestamp •to_yminterval •to_dsinterval
Views: 1760 khaled alkhudari
114- Oracle SQL 12c: Managing Data in Different Time Zones 2
 
10:12
•Time Zones. •Timestamp Data type •timestamp with time zone •timestamp with local time zone •V$TIMEZONE_NAMES •DBTIMEZONE •SESSIONTIMEZONE •current_date •current_timestamp •Localtimestamp •alter session set time_zone •Extract expression •TZ_OFFSET •from_tz •to_timestamp •to_yminterval •to_dsinterval
Views: 2047 khaled alkhudari

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